Category Archives: Development

Easily Save Your Vines to YouTube with Just a few Clicks

vine_to_youtubeOn Oct 27th, the folks at Vine (Twitter) announced that they were going to be shutting down Vine- mostly likely because they failed to monetize the service, and with an announced 9 percent layoff, it makes sense that they would start pruning off services that are just costing them money.

They insisted that that “Nothing is happening to the apps, website or you Vines today”, but they also gave no timelines on when the service will be shutting down.

Given that news, users have been looking for ways to save their Vines; you can, of course, simple download the video files directly. There have also been a few apps that quickly convert your vines to GIF’s- but the obvious downside, is the loss of audio.

To that end, I’ve created https://vinetoyoutube.com/

A very simple tool that will save any Vine video to your YouTube account. Just authorize your Google account, and paste in a Vine URL, and we’ll save that Vine to YouTube.

Why did you build this?

I couldn’t sleep and it only took me two hours- and maybe it’ll be useful to somebody out there that wants to preserve their Vines after Twitter shuts things down.

Is it secure?

Yup- the site is encrypted, I don’t save a copy of any of the Vines, and the Google authorization is session based, and not stored on our side, or in a cookie. So as soon as you close your browser, the authorization is cleared.

Cool, but I want to group multiple Vines in a single video?

That would be cool- and something I’ll add if people really want it. Contact me to let me know if this is something you really want.

If you have any questions or comments, contact me on Twitter.

Net_DNS2 v1.4.2 – SMIMEA and AVC Resource Records and SHA-256 SSHFP

I’ve released version 1.4.2 of the PEAR Net_DNS2 library- you can install it now through the command line PEAR installer:

pear install Net_DNS2

Or, you can also add it to your project using composer:

composer require pear/net_dns2

Version 1.4.2

  • changed the role for the README.md file to doc.
  • parse the resolv.conf options line; right now I just support the timeout and rotate options.
  • the options values only work if you set the new option use_resolv_options to true; this is to keep backwards compatibility.
  • added support for RFC 6594; support for SHA-256 and ECDSA in the SSHFP resource record.
  • added the SMIMEA resource record; this just extends the TLSA record.
  • added the AVC resource records; this just extends the TXT record.
  • added error and EDNS0 defines for DNS Cookies (RFC7873).
  • added EDNS0 defines to the lookup class.
  • dropped the Net_DNS2_Packet::formatIPv6() function; this was deprecated in v1.1.3.
  • re-wrote the Net_DNS2::expandIPv6() function. Based on testing, the new version is about twice as fast.

RBLTracker: Facebook Threat Exchange, New Website, and More!

After more than six month of design and development, we’ve launched a brand new version of the RBLTracker Blacklist Monitoring service and website. This release includes some long sought-after features, including a completely redesigned management portal, support for the Facebook Threat Exchange, and much much more.

New Management Portal

With a completely redesigned web portal, customers can easily manage all aspects of their RBLTracker account.

interface

Some key new features include:

  • Improved reporting and graphing features.
  • Additional payment options, including credit card payments, and auto-recharging account balances.
  • Easier management of accounts with large number of hosts.
  • Support for sub-accounts to split up account management roles for billing, development, and for read-only access users.
  • Support for contact groups by host, which allows custom alerting options by host.

Facebook Threat Exchange

threat_exchange_logosSupport for the new Facebook Threat Exchange service is now part of the standard RBLTracker monitoring process.

Facebook Threat Exchange is a shared network of malware and phishing attack targets, shared by a collaborative of social media and SaaS organizations, including Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr, Dropbox, and Yahoo.

RBLTracker monitors your host IP addresses and domains, against data collected from sources like Facebook posts, Dropbox files, and Pinterest pins. If your domain or IP address was used to try and spread malware or viruses on any of the supported platforms, you’ll receive alerts from RBLTracker.

RBLTracker.com: Now with DNSSEC and TLSA

The RBLTracker domain is now signed with DNSSEC, and we’ve published the website certificate fingerprint via a TLSA record (also known as DANE), so that you can be 100% sure you’re interacting with the RBLTracker servers. dnssec

This can be validated through the Verisign Labs Test Tool.

What is DNSSEC, and why do I care?

The point of DNSSEC is to provide a way for DNS records to be trusted by whoever receives them. The key innovation of DNSSEC is the use of public key cryptography to ensure that DNS records are authentic.

DNSSEC not only allows a DNS server to prove the authenticity of the records it returns. It also allows the assertion of “non-existence of records”.

What about DANE, what’s that all about?

DANE, or “DNS-based Authentication of Named Entities”, is a way for domain and website owners to publish SSL certificate fingerprints, so that visitors can validate that the certificate being used on a website is valid for that site.

Over the last few years, there have been several security breaches with Certificate Signing Authorities (CA’s)- companies that sign certificates that you use for your secure website- allowing the issuance of certificates for domains, not owned by the domain owners.

Using DANE, you can define exactly which certificate or CA is valid for your website, restricting the ability for a would-be hacker to masquerade as your website, by gaining access to your CA.

This obviously only makes sense in tandem with DNSSEC, as you need to validate that the DNS information providing the certificate fingerprint is valid, and not modified along the way.

How can I tell if a site is using DNSSEC/DANE?

Until there is more mainstream support for DNSSEC/DANE- for example, building support for it directly in the OS layer and in web browsers- there is a great browser plugin by cz.nic, that will show you when a site is protected with DNSSEC and DANE.

RBLTracker: Two-factor Authentication using Clef

clef2You can now log in to your RBLTracker account using secure, two-factor authentication using Clef.

Clef is secure two-factor authentication using your mobile device, with no passwords or tokens, and no personal data is shared between RBLTracker and Clef.

Simply download the Clef Mobile App, and then register your RBLTracker account with Clef from the Profile page of your RBLTracker account.

Once registered, you can log in and log out of the RBLTracker interface using your mobile device- it’s that easy! If you have any questions or comments about using Clef, please let us know @ info@rbltracker.com

Two-factor authentication is available to all RBLTracker accounts. Sign up Today!